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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Jan 6, 2009 2:38pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway

what's wrong with Yes????


Just say no

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Poster: alycabally Date: Jan 7, 2009 7:28am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway

The first time I saw Yes was in a bar, honestly, in Cincinnati in Probably 1969 or 1970, when we had a good music scene. I also saw Flash in the same bar, but I don't know if that was pre-Yes or post Yes.
Since then I have seen them scads of times and the TFTO was my favorite tour. Open with Close to the Edge, some hits, then all of TFTO, a few more hits and outyago.

They used to play here every tour. Tickets were reasonable and the music was good. Even saw Prick Wakeman's nonsense live once. Gentle Giant opened and PW would not let Procol Harum use GG equipment (their truck had broken down). Gary Brooker went to the local radio station and ripped Prick Wakeman. Funny stuff.

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Poster: Bob Gnarley Date: Jan 7, 2009 8:58am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway

Flash was formed after Banks had left Yes.
I guess it wasn't such a great career move for him to leave and start his own band.

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Poster: staggerleib Date: Jan 7, 2009 9:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway

Banks played for Genesis, and had a fairly decent solo career. I have 1983's "The Wicked Lady" which was pretty good.

As to solo careers post Genesis, we all know Phil the Shil's. while there was some decent music, particularly early on, for the most part it was commercial BS. Now, he's sucking on the Disney Kool Aid, and has lost all vitality.

Rutherford had Mike and the Mechanics, not a bad group, but still kind of poppy. But he did have a couple solo albums, Acting Very Strange was a really good album, but Smallcreep's Day was excellent.

Then there's Gabriel. I personally feel that he's never bowed to the popularity mode. He's always done what he wanted, and hasn't sacrificed musicality, professionalism, and artistic sensibilities. Sometimes his music hits a vein, and rises up the charts (Shock the Monkey, Sledgehammer, Don't Give Up, Solsbury Hill) but that's because they're great songs, and not because he aimed for a Hit.

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Poster: Bob Gnarley Date: Jan 7, 2009 9:48am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Non-Dead - The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway

I guess I should've been more specific.
I was referring to Peter Banks, the original Yes guitarist.